Refresh Natural Health

BE Sweet - Powder

$26.85 CAD

Product Description

  • Safe, sweet, smooth, all-natural sugar alternative with no aftertaste
  • Featuring a special combination of allulose + monk fruit + stevia
  • Easy to use as a zero-calorie one-to-one sugar swap
  • Diabetic-safe, gluten-free, plant-based
  • Body Ecology | Keto | Low-Carb | Paleo-friendly (1)
  • Rich, sugar-like sweetness
  • Try it for yourself and see!

Three cheers for a safe sugar substitute with an authentically sweet taste!

You will love Body Ecology’s new BE Sweet  liquid and powder, all-natural sugar replacement... Not only is it made from a specialized blend of three of the safest sugar substitutes, but it is also incredibly delicious, bitter-free, and satisfyingly sweet without an aftertaste. Our sugar alternative is made from a perfect blend of monk fruit, stevia, and allulose, leaving your sweet tooth satisfied.

All orders ship from Canada

Stevia and monk fruit are familiar all-natural sugar substitutes. However, allulose might be new to you.  This is another safe and healthy sugar substitute that has only recently come to fame. Allulose has a similar texture, taste, and feel as table sugar and is found naturally in a variety of foods we eat daily, such as figs, corn, and raisins.  Expect to start hearing much more about allulose -- and, soon, seeing it everywhere so you can enjoy an uncompromised taste of sweetness!

Allulose is considered “rare sugar.” What this means is that it is found in small quantities of foods we already regularly enjoy.  Once your body metabolizes allulose, it has a glycemic index of zero net carbs.  Allulose is low in calories and can pass through your body without significant metabolism needed. (1)

Studies suggest allulose may suppress the glycemic response of other carbohydrates when consumed with a meal. (2)  In fact, because of how allulose metabolizes, it is considered non-glycemic

Here’s a closer look at what makes BE Sweet™ so special:

  • Ideal for low-carb diets: BE Sweet™ contains  0 grams of net carbs per teaspoon. You can use it just like sugar.
  • Safe for diabetics. Since allulose doesn’t need to be metabolized -- and has a tenth of the calories of sugar, it will not elevate blood sugar levels. (3)
  • Safe for everyone. As of 2012, the FDA has deemed allulose GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) and suitable to use as a substitute for sugar and fructose. (4) 
  • Great for the gut. Studies show allulose to be a well-tolerated sugar alternative that doesn’t cause gastrointestinal troubles. (5)
  • Looks like the real thing: BE Sweet™ powder caramelizes and browns just like sugar, while BE Sweet™ liquid dissolves easily in hot/cold beverages (like coffee and tea).
  • Tastes even better: No need to trick your tastebuds. Reviewers agree that, compared to sugar, BE Sweet™ is downright delicious. 

We know sugar isn’t good for us. Think fatigue, potential tumor growth, and an increased risk for heart disease risk among seemingly healthy people. (6-8) Plus, sugar can cause a hangover! After a sugar binge, you can experience the same symptoms you’d expect after a late night of drinking too much alcohol.  Think foggy minds, mood swings, and other negative physical responses. Sugar might taste good, but it just isn’t good for us. 

When you eat too much sugar, candida yeast will flood your body with a toxic byproduct called acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde is an organic chemical compound your body makes that is considered a probable human carcinogen.  It is also the compound that is behind hangovers and hangover-like symptoms. This means you can expect to experience hangover-like symptoms after eating too much sugar. Keep in mind that most natural sugars will feed candida.  Eating too much sugar has to the capacity to destroy your immune system and potentially create more uncontrollable sugar cravings. (9)


It is also important to remember our human desire for sweet-tasting foods and drinks is nothing to be ashamed of -- or suppressed! It’s quite normal. Our very first food, mother's milk, was warm and sweet, and we've formed an emotional bond with this taste. Avoiding sweets isn’t the answer. 


The solution lies in finding a satisfying and safe sugar swap that you actually enjoy and is good for you!  


At Body Ecology, we recommend eliminating sugar until you’ve healed candida or have seen improvement in other areas of your health. Once you have eliminated it, we suggest keeping it out of your diet as much as possible.  This will help you avoid the sugar hangover, sugar cravings and promote health and slow aging.

With BE Sweet™, you don’t need a reason to celebrate

Bottom line? Now, with BE Sweet, you can have your cake and eat it too!

BE Sweet is the natural sugar substitute we all have been waiting for.  And not only does it allow us to kick our sugar habits, it is also healthy! With zero chemical aftertaste and the simple taste of real sugar, BE Sweet is perfect for everyone! We created BE Sweet™ so you can stop your sugar intake and celebrate a new healthy, sweet alternative your body deserves. Even better, by switching to Be Sweet, you can even kick your sugar cravings and eliminate your sweet tooth.  Multiple studies show that low-calorie sweeteners don’t cause more cravings like sugar would. (10,11)

Even without sugar, life can still be sweet. Now, the only decision you need to make is whether you want the BE Sweet™ liquid or powder. We think it is best to stock up on both to simplify cooking and baking, sweetening all types of foods and beverages, and cover your bases.

References:

1. “The Declaration of Allulose and Calories from Allulose on Nutrition and Supplement Facts Labels: Guidance for Industry.” FDA, October 2020

2. Iida T, Kishimoto Y, Yoshikawa Y, Hayashi N, Okuma K, Tohi M, Yagi K, Matsuo T, Izumori K. Acute D-psicose administration decreases the glycemic responses to an oral maltodextrin tolerance test in normal adults. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 2008; 54:511-514.

3. Tomoya Shintani, Takako Yamada, Noriko Hayashi, Tetsuo Iida, Yasuo Nagata, Nobuaki Ozaki, Yukiyasu Toyoda. Rare Sugar Syrup Containing d-Allulose but Not High-Fructose Corn Syrup Maintains Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Sensitivity Partly via Hepatic Glucokinase Translocation in Wistar Rats. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2017; DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b05627.

4. “GRN No. 400, D-psicose.” U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 2012.

5. Han Y, Choi BR, Kim SY, et al. Gastrointestinal Tolerance of D-Allulose in Healthy and Young Adults. A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2018;10(12):2010. Published 2018 Dec 19. doi:10.3390/nu1012201

6. Konstantinos Mantantzis, Friederike Schlaghecken, Sandra I. Sünram-Lea, Elizabeth A. Maylor. Sugar Rush or Sugar Crash? A Meta-Analysis of Carbohydrate Effects on Mood. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 2019; DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.03.016.

7. Ken Peeters, Frederik Van Leemputte, Baptiste Fischer, Beatriz M. Bonini, Hector Quezada, Maksym Tsytlonok, Dorien Haesen, Ward Vanthienen, Nuno Bernardes, Carmen Bravo Gonzalez-Blas, Veerle Janssens, Peter Tompa, Wim Versées, Johan M. Thevelein. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate couples glycolytic flux to activation of Ras. Nature Communications, 2017; 8 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01019-z.

8. A. Margot Umpleby, Fariba Shojaee-Moradie, Barbara Fielding, Xuefei Li, Andrea Marino, Najlaa Alsini, Cheryl Isherwood, Nicola Jackson, Aryati Ahmad, Michael Stolinski, Julie Anne Lovegrove, Sigurd Johnsen, Jeewaka Mendis, John Wright, Malgorzata E Wilinska, Roman Hovorka, Jimmy Bell, Louise E Thomas, Gary Frost, Bruce Arthur Griffin. Impact of liver fat on the differential partitioning of hepatic triacylglycerol into VLDL subclasses on high and low sugar diets. Clinical Science, 2017; CS20171208 DOI: 10.1042/CS20171208.

9. Man A, Ciurea CN, Pasaroiu D, et al. New perspectives on the nutritional factors influencing growth rate of Candida albicans in diabetics. An in vitro study. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2017;112(9):587-592. doi:10.1590/0074-02760170098.

10. G. Harvey Anderson, John Foreyt, Madeleine Sigman-Grant, David B. Allison, The Use of Low-Calorie Sweeteners by Adults: Impact on Weight Management, The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 142, Issue 6, June 2012, Pages 1163s–1169s, https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.111.149617.

11. Richard D Mattes, Barry M Popkin, Nonnutritive sweetener consumption in humans: effects on appetite and food intake and their putative mechanisms, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 89, Issue 1, January 2009, Pages 1–14, https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.26792.

*Information and statements regarding dietary supplements/products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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